The Python Angle


It continue to be journey for Python in finance.  The JP Morgan Athena project that (based on google data) pushed to retire Murex, using concepts born out of Slang/SecDB is now a number of years old, as presumably achieve many goals.  In many ways the Quartz project over at Bank of America Merrill Lynch’s offers integrated trading, position management, pricing and risk management platform which correlate in many ways to the Athena JP Morgan project, that it correlates back to GS ;)  The Python Quants about page offer a hint of the history of these three corporations/projects.

Another interesting Python angle is the NumPy/SciPy Many-Core Accelerator support available on Parallella.  Especially given the recent blog posting regards 64-cores, and the fact that Bank of America, and presumably JPMorgan are doing “Ultra High Performance” pricing.

The journey continues when we look at Washington Square Technologies.  The web site offers the briefest of information:

open development environment that is integrated with market data, reference data, market conventions, high level business objects, and all the source code

Does this mean its version 4?  Have Bank of America and JP Morgan co-funded a new product company?  Should we expect this “environment” to appear in numerous other banks in the near future, offering Python a rich and rosy future for both sides of the financial playing field?

Buy side or sell side, securities or derivatives, trading strategy development, derivative pricing and execution, risk management, or operational workflows

Python contractors probably have a rosy future😉

Final thought:  JP Morgan Athena appears to be ahead in the buzz word bingo game with an appropriate reactive feature set for Athena – especially given the great work on in Reactive Streams, and by TypeSafe with Akka Streams.

~ by mdavey on April 30, 2014.

4 Responses to “The Python Angle”

  1. Main things I’ve heard about Quartz is that its really slow and causing big problems. The people I know on Athena work in Commodities that is getting spun off. I wouldn’t have thought these projects are classed as successful.

  2. […] Tales flags some interesting developments in the Python world. The demand for Python developers in finance does seem to be building. Both Man and Getco are big users, and as Tales points out, JP Morgan and BAML both use Python as the primary programming languages in their Athena and Quartz systems, both of which are inspired by Goldman’s SecDB/Slang. Tales wonders if Washington Square Tech will the fourth implementation of this paradigm; I believe it may be the fifth, as Morgan Stanley had an Athena like project called Pioneer during Jay Dweck’s ill fated tenure. Apparently that project is now defunct. The Athena paradigm is technically a very powerful solution for trading businesses that have run on ad hoc solutions using Excel for pricing and risk. This could be very appealing for buy side firms that don’t have big in house tech stacks, together with incumbent tech teams defending them against replacements. […]

  3. […] Tales flags some interesting developments in the Python world. The demand for Python developers in finance does seem to be building. Both Man and Getco are big users, and as Tales points out, JP Morgan and BAML both use Python as the primary programming languages in their Athena and Quartz systems, both of which are inspired by Goldman’s SecDB/Slang. Tales wonders if Washington Square Tech will the fourth implementation of this paradigm; I believe it may be the fifth, as Morgan Stanley had an Athena like project called Pioneer during Jay Dweck’s ill fated tenure. Apparently that project is now defunct. The Athena paradigm is technically a very powerful solution for trading businesses that have run on ad hoc solutions using Excel for pricing and risk. Partly because they seek to replace Excel based pricing and risk, and partly because it’s compute efficient, all implementations of the Athena SecDB/Slang paradigm implement Directed Acyclic Graphs. I’m guessing that Washington Square Tech will think this could be very appealing for buy side firms that don’t have big in house tech stacks, together with incumbent tech teams defending them against replacements. […]

  4. Reblogged this on datahacks.

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